Introduction

Egg, Sperm or embryo freezing may be required as part of a fertility treatment cycle or for fertility preservation purposes.

Before we can freeze any eggs, sperm or embryos we must screen for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. To do this we need one blood sample and this can be taken at your GP practice or in the Centre.

Egg Freezing - Procedure

In order to obtain eggs for freezing a full IVF cycle must be undertaken.

After your egg recovery only the mature eggs, are prepared before being placed in storage tanks. Not all eggs collected at the egg recovery may be suitable for freezing as they may not be mature enough and will not survive the processes. Eggs are the largest cells in the human body and are more difficult to freeze and thaw without damaging them.

The success rates have improved in recent years as a result of using a technique called Vitrification. Previously ice crystals formed during the freezing process however the Vitrification technique prevents ice formation as the egg is dehydrated to get rid of as much water as possible then plunged into liquid nitrogen.

When the eggs are to be used they are removed from the storage tanks, thawed and then ICSI can be undertaken on the surviving eggs.

egg_donating1.png
egg_donating2.png

Sperm Freezing - Procedure

It is important not to have sex or masturbate for at least 3 days but no longer than 7 days before producing a sample for freezing. If you live near the hospital you can produce the sample at home, as long as it can be delivered to the laboratory within 1 hour, otherwise we have designated rooms available for men to use to produce samples.

The sample will be analysed in a similar manner to the routine semen analysis then mixed with a solution to protect the sperm through the processes of freezing and thawing before being divided in small amounts (straws) for freezing. The number of straws in storage will depend on the volume of the sample.

A few days later one straw will be thawed to test how well the sample has survived. This information will enable the laboratory to assess the number of straws needed for treatment.

The survival of sperm after freezing is highly variable and more than one sample may be required. Freezing and thawing reduces the fertility of a semen sample and, in a very few cases, freezing may not be successful.

freezing-img1.png
freezing-img2.png

Embryo Freezing - Procedure

Should you wish to freeze any surplus, good quality embryos following your IVF/ICSI treatment you will have an opportunity to do so.

The success rates have improved in recent years as a result of using a technique called Vitrification. Previously ice crystals formed during the freezing process however the Vitrification technique prevents ice formation as the egg is dehydrated to get rid of as much water as possible then plunged into liquid nitrogen. On average we have a survival rate of at least 90%, however, there is a risk that there will be no surviving embryos available for replacement following thawing.

Frozen Embryo Replacement

The replacement of any frozen embryos can be undertaken at any time and we would meet with you to discuss the best process for you and how many embryos we would thaw to put back. If you have embryos stored that are at blastocyst stage (day 5) we would suggest we thaw the number we have agreed to transfer on the day of the transfer.

If you have embryos frozen before day 5 stage we may suggest thawing several of them and allowing them to develop in the lab for a few days before transfer and can even refreeze good quality embryos that develop if we have more than is required.

All options will be discussed with you and our Embryology lab team prior to obtaining your consent to undertake your wishes.

embryo_donation.png
embryo_donation1.png

Further Information

If you would like any further information, please get in touch. One of the team will be happy to guide you through the process and answer any questions you may have.

Click here for more information on costs or referral.